Key Sustainability Indicators

In compliance with the ‘Sustainability Reporting Guidelines’ of the Global Reporting Initiatives (GRI), the following table shows the core indicators. Additional indicators are given only when linked with a report. When indicators are not applicable or not significant in relation to Company business, explanations therefor are supplied.

The reference documents for additional information are available on the web site www.saipem.com.

Economic Performance

GRI Code GRI Description Saipem Performance Indicator Additional Information
EC1  Direct economic value generated and distributed Table 
EC2  Financial implications and other risks and opportunities for the organization’s activities due to climate change Saipem adopts a risk management system that includes environmental and country risks which are identified, monitored and tackled. Further details are available in the 2011 Annual Report in the section ‘Risk Management’.
EC3  Coverage of the organization’s defined benefit plan obligations Table
Further information on employee benefits and seniority bonuses is available in the appropriate chapters of the 2011 Annual Report.
EC4  Significant financial assistance received from governments At Corporate level, no significant financings from central governments have been granted. At local level, any tax relief conceded is part of agreements signed with each country and is confidential due to its strategic and competitive relevance. 
EC6  Policy, practices, and proportion of spending on locally-based suppliers at significant locations of operation Table With reference to the Code of Ethics, Saipem undertakes to contribute to the socio-economic development of the communities in which it operates, using local businesses as far as possible. In 2011, out of a total of €8,741 million in orders, excluding €2,233 million for investments in Company assets and staff costs, €3,668 million were from local vendors.
EC7  Procedures for local hiring and proportion of senior management hired from the local community at locations of significant operation Table
Optimizing Local Content is a cornerstone of Saipem’s sustainability strategy. Further details are available in the Human Resources section of the 2011 Annual Report, in the Sustainability section of the web site, and in the document ‘Saipem Sustainability 2011’.
EC8  Development and impact of infrastructure investments and services provided primarily for public benefit through commercial, in-kind, or pro bono engagement Table
Saipem has internal procedures and tools for defining, implementing and monitoring initiatives for host communities. Initiatives are based on an analysis of local stakeholders and their expectations and are normally implemented or coordinated by Saipem operating companies, often in cooperation with local bodies. Further analysis and details on initiatives implemented in 2011 are available in the document ‘Saipem Sustainability 2011’.
EC9  Understanding and describing significant indirect economic impacts, including the extent of impacts Saipem has adopted a tool for assessing the positive effects generated on local areas by its strategy of maximizing Local Content. Known as ‘Saipem Externalities Local Content Evaluation’ (SELCE), the model takes into account the indirect positive effects on the supply chain and the induced effects generated on society. Further analysis and details of the SELCE model and results for operating areas in which it was applied during 2011 are available in the document ‘Saipem Sustainability 2011’.

Environmental performance

GRI Code GRI Description
Saipem Performance Indicator
Additional Information
EN1  Materials used by weight or volume As a contractor operating in the Oil & Gas industry, the use Saipem makes of the main raw materials in its operating contexts is dictated by the contract conditions set out by the Client (when the materials are not supplied directly by the Client itself, even as semi-finished products). Therefore, from both an economic and environmentally responsible perspective, raw materials fall under the Scope of Work. 
EN2  Percentage of materials used that are recycled input material This indicator is not applicable, for the reasons given in the previous indicator.
EN3  Direct energy consumption by primary energy source Table
Energy consumption includes the activity of subcontractors who have operated on Saipem sites and have been supplied with fuel directly by the Company.
EN4  Indirect energy consumption by primary energy source Table
 
EN5Energy saved due to conservation and efficiency improvementsThis indicator is not covered quantitatively. It should be noted, however, that there has been an increasing commitment to energy saving at Corporate level, which includes the launching of several initiatives in this regard.Various awareness-raising initiatives have been implemented to promote environmentally respectful behaviours among employees, for example by placing energy saving posters and stickers in offices and by starting up a pilot project in San Donato Milanese (Italy) on saving energy consumed by PCs. Again in 2011 the shut-down all diesel generators from the Kuryk base in Kazakhstan was completed, and the base is now supplied from the public grid. However, the generators remain on stand-by in the event of emergency. Further details are available in the document ‘Saipem Sustainability 2011’.
EN6  Initiatives to provide energy-efficient or renewable energy-based products and services, and reductions in energy requirements as a result of these initiatives Table
EN8
Total water withdrawal by source Table

EN9
Water sources significantly affected by withdrawal of water Saipem works in areas where hydric stress conditions differ considerably. Water consumption is one of the environmental features assessed during both preparation phase and in the execution of projects, temporary and permanent offices.
Although the consumption of fresh water is normally quite limited, when water consumption is considered significant and the area particularly sensitive, special mitigation measures are implemented to limit impact.In areas with hydric stress, the reuse of water is strongly encouraged and is normally achieved by installing treatment systems that facilitate reuse for purposes of irrigation and dust abatement in site areas.
In 2011 the ‘Save and Reuse Water’ campaign was launched to promote water saving behaviour and practice. Further details are available in the document ‘Saipem Sustainability 2011’. The document ‘Saipem Sustainability 2010’, which is available on the Saipem web site, also includes specific sections on this theme.
EN10
Percentage and total volume of water recycled and reused Table
EN11 Location and size of land owned, leased, managed in, or adjacent to, protected areas and areas of high biodiversity value outside protected areasSaipem operates for the most part in areas owned and run by the Client. In the case of areas owned, mainly fabrication yards, Saipem has implemented an impact monitoring system in relation to its own activities, including any possible effects on the biodiversity of the surrounding areas. 
EN12Description of significant impacts of activities, products, and services on biodiversity in protected areas and areas of high biodiversity value outside protected areasDue to the type of business it conducts, Saipem can find itself operating in protected areas or areas of high biodiversity, both onshore and offshore. As a contractor, Saipem works on projects and in areas for which the Client normally supplies an Environmental Impact Assessment. Contrarily, or when conditions make it necessary, Saipem carries out environmental impact studies that include a systematic assessment of the effects on biodiversity, with the purpose of evaluating and implementing specific, project-based compensatory solutions to maintain the original environment.The document ‘Saipem Sustainability 2011’ provides details on the Offshore LNGi Toscana (OLT) project. This is a floating storage and regasification unit (FSRU) which will be permanently anchored offshore Livorno (Italy). The area in question is populated by protected marine species and is near a National Park, all of which determined the need to monitor and reimplant Posidonia in an area of 2.25 m2.
EN14Strategies, current actions, and future plans for managing impacts on biodiversityWhile not yet having defined any strategies and actions at Group level, Saipem is sensitive to the theme of biodiversity and monitors its own potential effects within its Environment Management System implemented in all operating contexts. Management of potential effects, and related mitigation measures, is therefore practiced at the level of individual projects and operating conditions. In 2011 specific measures were applied on projects in Italy, Algeria and Australia, as described in the document ‘Saipem Sustainability 2011’.
EN16Total direct and indirect greenhouse gas emissions by weightTable
The project ‘I turn my engine off when parked’ is a case in point. It was implemented in Kazakhstan with a view to increasing environmental awareness and reducing unnecessary emissions into the atmosphere by means of practical suggestions to protect the environment and avoid wasting resources. Further details are available in the document ‘Saipem Sustainability 2011’.
EN18Initiatives to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and reductions achievedSaipem is working to improve its direct emissions monitoring system with a view to implementing appropriate initiatives and to improving and broadening its assessment of the effects of its reduction measures, which is currently limited to specific operating projects. The new ‘Emissions Estimation Manual’ supplies a complete, coherent and transparent method for estimating the quantities of specific polluting substances emitted into the atmosphere. The approach used derives from a combination of information on the magnitude and type of human activity considered (in Saipem these are the consumption of fuel and electricity), with coefficients called Emission Factors (EF). The Manual was updated in 2011 and certified by Bureau Veritas.The project ‘I turn my engine off when parked’ is a case in point. Implemented in Kazakhstan, it seeks to raise environmental awareness and provides practical suggestions for protecting the environment and avoiding the waste of resources. Further details are available in the document ‘Saipem Sustainability 2011’
EN19Emission of ozone-depleting substances by weightSaipem does not yet have precise data on the quantities of ozone damaging substances in use. However, use of substances which can damage the ozone is considered an environmental issue that needs to be kept under control, in as much as such substances are not used in the productive cycle, but rather for refrigerators and air conditioners. Use and monitoring thereof is in compliance with the law. A programme for replacing these substances in all Italian offices that use them is currently under way. 
EN20NOx, SOx, and other significant air emissions by type and weight Table  
EN21Total water discharge by quality and destinationTable 
Data on water discharged in 2009 includes ballast water from fleet vessels. A focus on the ‘Zero Discharge’ project in Kazakhstan, thanks to which no type of water is discharged any longer into the Caspian Sea, is available in the document ‘Saipem Sustainability 2011’.
EN22Total weight of waste by type and disposal method Table Further details on initiatives implemented during the year (for example, paper and cardboard recycling in Qatar) are available in the document ‘Saipem Sustainability 2011’.
EN23Total number and volume of significant spills Table The data given for volumes of substances spilled in 2010 is partial, since monitoring of the indicator for all significant operations became functional only from 2011.
EN24Weight of transported, imported, exported, or treated waste deemed hazardous under the terms of the Basel Convention Annex I, II, III, and VIII, and percentage of transported waste shipped internationallyEach onshore site has signed an agreement with a local waste management company assessed for its professionalism and correctness before the contract is awarded. Waste is treated and disposed of locally. No cases of waste being transported abroad have been recorded. 
EN26Initiatives to mitigate environmental impacts of products and services, and extent of impact mitigationAs a contractor operating in the Oil & Gas industry, from a contractual perspective Saipem does not accept responsibility for the products and services supplied, since these are defined and managed by the Client. However, Saipem adopts all measures necessary to safeguard the environment during the execution of works carried out using its personnel and equipment and during operations over which it has operational control.Many examples of projects in which Saipem was involved in 2011 are given in the document ‘Saipem Sustainability 2011’ in the chapter on safeguarding the environment. These include, for example, the OLT project in Italy and the Nord Stream project in the Baltic Sea.
EN27Percentage of products sold and their packaging materials that are reclaimed by categoryNot relevant. Products and services sold by Saipem do not require packaging. 
EN28Monetary value of significant fines and total number of non-monetary sanctions for non-compliance with environmental laws and regulationsIn 2011 Saipem did not receive any significant fine and/or non-monetary sanction for non-compliance with environmental laws and regulations. 
EN30Total environmental protection expenditures and investments by type Table 

Employment

GRI Code
GRI Description
Saipem Performance Indicator
Additional Information
Employment  
LA1  Total workforce by employment type, employment contract, and region TableFurther details on employment are supplied in the ‘People’ section of this document and in ‘Saipem Sustainability 2011’.
LA2  Total number and rate of employee turnover by age group, gender, and region Table
LA3  Benefits provided to full-time employees that are not provided to temporary or part-time employees, by major operations With reference to Italy, benefits offered to workers with part-time and/or fixed-term contracts do not differ from those given to workers with full-time and/or open-ended contracts.
Industrial relations  
LA4Employees covered by collective bargaining agreementsTable 
LA5Minimum notice period(s) regarding operational changes, including whether it is specified in collective agreementsThe minimum period of notification for operational changes differs from country to country, and in any case is in line with laws and trade union agreements in force in the individual countries in which Saipem operates. As regards project management, it should be noted that the duration of operations is specified in the contract itself.
For organizational changes that affect the Company’s set-up, Saipem ensures timely and prior notice to the trade union representatives in order to share Company choices and inform workers in a widespread manner.
 
Workplace Health and Safety  
LA6Percentage of total workforce represented in formal joint management worker health and safety committees that help monitor and advice on occupational health and safety programmesTable 
LA7Rates of injury, occupational diseases, lost days, and absenteeism, and number of work related fatalities by regionTableThe LTIFR and TRIFR values have been calculated on the basis of 1,000,000 hours worked, in compliance with the standards applied internationally in the industry.
LA8Education, training, counselling, prevention, and risk-control programmes in place to assist workforce members, their families, or community members regarding serious diseasesTableVarious initiatives implemented in 2011 are described in the document ‘Saipem Sustainability 2011’. These include anti-malaria programmes both for employees and local populations, as well as prevention campaigns for diseases such as diabetes, tuberculosis and heart disease. HSE training initiatives for employees are detailed in the document ‘Saipem Sustainability 2011’.
LA9Health and safety topics covered in formal agreements with trade unionsThe promotion of health and safety is also supported by national and Company level agreements. These are shared with trade unions and determine the methods for managing the health and safety of workers, particularly in relation to:
  • setting up workers H&S committees (composition and number);
  • compulsory use of personal protection equipment;
  • special training plans for H&S officers (Company and worker representatives) and widespread diffusion of information on H&S themes to all employees;
  • periodical meetings between the Company and workers’ representatives.
In Italy, workplace health, safety and environment are regulated by specific contract clauses and by the national labour contract. Specifically, the latter requires the appointment of worker representatives for the protection of the health, safety and environment of workers. This is done by election and the number of representatives is set by law and by the national labour contract. Furthermore, Saipem has partially linked the payment of bonuses not just to profitability and productivity indicators, but also to health and safety objectives.
 
Training and Education
LA10Average hours of training per year per employee by employee categoryTableDivision of training hours by employee category is done on the basis of estimations of average participation in training initiatives. A more detailed monitoring system is currently being implemented.
LA11Programmes for skills management and lifelong learning that support the continued employability of employees and assist them in managing career endingsTable 
LA12Percentage of employees receiving regular performance and career development reviewsTable 
Diversity and Equal Opportunities  
LA13Composition of governance bodies and breakdown of employees per category according to gender, age group, minority group membership, and other indicators of diversityTable 
LA14Ratio of basic salary of men to women by employee categoryTableUnlike other employee indicators, for the basic pay indicator the employees are divided up using the Hay Job Evaluation System.
 Employment  
LA15*Return to work and retention rates after parental leave, by genderSaipem prioritises the retention of qualified personnel, and recognizes in maternity, paternity and training leave a vital element of support in this regard.
Workers enjoy leave periods according to the law and to local trade union agreements. For this reason, employees, independent of their gender, return to work in positions that safeguard the professionalism acquired, the pay in force at the moment of the return to work and participation in the professional growth programmes planned by the Company. With reference to Italy and to 2011, no employment contracts were terminated at the end of the leave periods requested.
 
(*) The indicator refers to version G3.1 of the GRI guidelines.

Human rights

GRI Code GRI Description Saipem Performance Indicator Additional Information
Investment and Procurement Practices
HR1  Percentage and total number of significant investment agreements that include Human Rights clauses or that have undergone Human Rights screeningVendors supplying Saipem must read and accept in its totality the Company’s Model 231 comprising the Code of Ethics, which is founded on the principles of the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the Fundamental Principles of the International Labour Organization and the OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises. Model 231 is included in all standard contracts issued by Saipem. Acceptance of an order implies acceptance of Saipem’s Code of Ethics, which remains in force for the totality of orders. 
HR2  Percentage of significant suppliers and contractors that have undergone screening on human rights and actions takenTableFurther details on the inclusion of social and labour rights requirements in compliance with the ILO’s ‘Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work’ and with standard SA800, as well as on the pilot programme for audits on vendors deemed most at risk in terms of noncompliance, are available in the document ‘Saipem Sustainability 2011’.
HR3  Total hours of employee training on policies and procedures concerning aspects of Human Rights that are relevant to operations, including the percentage of employees trained Table

Non-discrimination
HR4  Total number of incidents of discrimination and actions taken TableReports received are handled according to the methods described in the procedure ‘Reports of Misdemeanours Received by Saipem and Subsidiaries’.
Freedom of Association and Collective Bargaining
HR5
Operations identified in which the right to exercise freedom of association and collective bargaining may be at significant risk, and actions taken to support these rightsAll vendors must read and accept in its totality the Company’s Model 231 comprising the Code of Ethics, which is founded on the principles of the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the Fundamental Principles of the International Labour Organization and the OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises. Furthermore, in 2011 Saipem integrated its vendor assessment process with a view to evaluating the Social Responsibility of its supply chain. The current vendor qualification system has been supplemented with requirements concerning respect for social and labour rights, in compliance with the ‘Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work’ of the International Labour Organization (ILO), as well as with standard SA8000, with a focus on the following main aspects: child and forced labour, freedom of association and right to collective bargaining, remuneration, working hours, discrimination and disciplinary practices, health and safety. A programme of specific audits was implemented, beginning with Chinese and Indian vendors who are deemed most at risk in terms of non-compliance.
Child Labour 
HR6 Operations identified as having significant risk for incidents of child labour, and measures taken to contribute to the elimination of child labour
Forced and Compulsory Labour 
HR7 Operations identified as having significant risk for incidents of forced or compulsory labour, and measures to contribute to the elimination of forced or compulsory labourFurther details on checks in relation to the freedom of association and child and forced labour are available in the document ‘Saipem Sustainability 2011’ in the chapter on Local Procurement.
Security Practices
HR8Percentage of security personnel trained in the organization’s policies or procedures concerning aspects of Human Rights that are relevant to operations TableFurther details on checks in relation to the freedom of association and child and forced labour are available in the document ‘Saipem Sustainability 2011’ in the chapter on Local Procurement.
Indigenous Rights
HR9  Total number of incidents of violations involving rights of indigenous people and actions takenNo reports have been received on this issue.Further details on checks in relation to the freedom of association and child and forced labour are available in the document ‘Saipem Sustainability 2011’ in the chapter on Local Procurement.
Assessment
HR10* Percentage and total number of operations that have been subject to human rights reviews and/or impact assessmentsTable
Further details on checks in relation to the freedom of association and child and forced labour are available in the document ‘Saipem Sustainability 2011’ in the chapter on Local Procurement.
Corrective Actions
HR11* Number of grievances related to human rights filed, addressed, and resolved through formal grievance mechanisms TableReports received are handled according to the methods described in the procedure ‘Reports of Misdemeanours Received by Saipem and Subsidiaries’.
(*) The indicator refers to version G3.1 of the GRI guidelines.

Society

GRI Code GRI Description Saipem Performance Indicator Additional Information
Local Communities
S1  Nature, scope, and effectiveness of any programmes and practices that assess and manage the impacts of operations on communities, including entering, operating, and exitingAs a contractor, Saipem is not responsible for the impacts of the product requested by the Client. In the management of operational projects, often it is the Client who supplies a Socio-Economic Impact Assessment with which Saipem must comply. Furthermore, in many cases the Client holds on to the sole direct contract with the host communities. In other cases, Saipem adopts all the measures necessary to assess the potential impacts of its activities and the measures needed to mitigate these, as well as specific activities and projects targeted at the socio-economic development of the local context.Examples of initiatives implemented in 2011, such as projects for local communities in Peru, Angola (Food plus Bio Diesel) and training for local youth (Papua New Guinea and elsewhere), are described in the document ‘Saipem Sustainability 2011’.
S9*
Operations with significant potential or actual negative impacts on local communitiesOperations where Saipem has direct responsibility for the impacts generated on the local context include the construction of new fabrication yards. In these cases, Saipem at all times carries out a Socio-Economic Impact Assessment (positive and negative) in order to maximize the benefits for the host communities and minimize any negative effects on them. Furthermore, where necessary, and when not supplied by the Client, the methodologies of the Environmental, Social and Health Impact Assessment (ESHIA) are adopted to assess the degree to which project activities or project-related activities can affect the surrounding populations. This methodology facilitates the pinpointing of any strategies required to mitigate these impacts. Examples of initiatives implemented in 2011, such as projects for local communities in Peru, Angola (Food plus Bio Diesel) and training for local youth (Papua New Guinea and elsewhere), are described in the document ‘Saipem Sustainability 2011’.
S10*
Prevention and mitigation measures implemented in operations with significant potential or actual negative impacts on local communitiesWhere Saipem has direct responsibility for impacts generated on the local context, following the Socio-Economic Impact Assessment it draws up an Action Plan to mitigate and manage these impacts. The document ‘Saipem Sustainability 2011’ details activities associated with the construction (and entering into operation) of new yards in Brazil and Indonesia.
Corruption
S2Percentage and total number of business units analysed for risks related to corruptionIn so far as applicable, details on initiatives against corruption are described in the document ‘Corporate Governance Report and Shareholding Structure 2011’.The document ‘Saipem Sustainability 2011’ details activities associated with the construction (and entering into operation) of new yards in Brazil and Indonesia.
S3Percentage of employees trained in the organization’s anti-corruption policies and proceduresTable  
S4Actions taken in response to incidents of corruptionAt the time of writing, no cases of corruption have been ascertained. At any rate, anti-corruption procedures and Saipem’s Model 231 provide for corrective measures and disciplinary sanctions in the event of the violation of laws, regulations or procedures in this regard. Furthermore, specific contract clauses provide for the termination of contracts in force whenever trade partners, brokers or subcontractors violate anti-corruption laws or internal procedures. The corrective measures deemed necessary and most appropriate are taken on the basis of any violations and the manner in which they were committed.For further information on disputes outstanding in this regard, see the paragraphs on the TSKJ Consortium and Kuwait in the ‘Legal proceedings’ section of the 2011 Annual Report.
Public Policy
S5Public policy positions and participation in public policy development and lobbyingSaipem believes that correct, transparent and participative dialogue with institutions, NGOs and civil society is a key factor in gaining trust and operating with respect for local communities. Saipem has always been proactive in dialogue with national and international institutions, through the direct interventions of its top management and indirectly through several associations to which it belongs. 
S6Total value of financial and in-kind contributions to political parties, politicians, and related institutions by countrySaipem does not make direct or indirect contributions to parties, movements, committees and political organizations, or to their delegates and candidates, except when provided for by specific regulations.
Anti-Competitive Behaviour  
S7Total number of legal actions for anti-competitive behaviour, anti-trust, and monopoly practices and their outcomesIn 2011, Saipem was not served with any legal notices for anti-competitive behaviour and/or anti-trust and monopoly practices.
Compliance  
S8Monetary value of significant fines and total number of non-monetary sanctions for non-compliance with laws and regulationsIn 2011, Saipem did not receive any significant fine and/or non-monetary sanction for non-compliance with laws and regulations.For further information in this regard, see the paragraph on the TSKJ Consortium in the ‘Legal proceedings’ section of the 2011 Annual Report.
(*) The indicator refers to version G3.1 of the GRI guidelines.

Product Responsability

GRI Code GRI Description Saipem Performance Indicator
Additional Information
Client Health and Safety 
PR1  Life cycle stages in which health and safety impacts of products and services are assessed for improvement, and percentage of significant products and services categories subject to such proceduresAs a contractor, Saipem operates at all times in accordance with Client requests, and responsibility for the product remains the Client’s by contract. However, Saipem participates in the safeguarding of the health and safety of all personnel working on its operations as well as those of the host communities, thereby contributing significantly to several of the phases required to ensure the safety of the product, which includes obtaining certification from third parties.Saipem has implemented specific management procedures and processes for particularly complex systems, where the operational risks linked with health and safety are highest (see the chapter ‘Efficiency for sustainable business’ in the document ‘Saipem Sustainability 2011’).
PR2  Total number of incidents of non-compliance with regulations and voluntary codes concerning health and safety impacts of products and services during their life cycle, by type of outcomesSaipem operates at all times in observance of international laws and regulations and of Client requests.
Product and Service Labelling
PR3Type of product and service information required by procedures, and percentage of significant products and services subject to such information requirementsNot relevant. The products supplied by Saipem comply with the contractual conditions set by the Client. 
PR4Total number of incidents of non-compliance with regulations and voluntary codes concerning product and service information and labelling, by type of outcomesNot relevant. Saipem supplies products that do not require labelling, and in any case the benchmarks for technical and quality standards are the conditions set out by the Client in the contract.  
PR5Practices related to customer satisfaction, including results of surveys measuring customer satisfactionTable 
Marketing Communication
PR6Programmes for adherence to laws, standards, and voluntary codes related to marketing communications, including advertising, promotion and sponsorshipNot relevant. For Saipem, the Client is substantially different from a ‘consumer’, and is understood, rather, as a ‘customer’. 
PR7Total number of incidents of non-compliance with regulations and voluntary codes concerning marketing communications, including advertising, promotion, and sponsorship by type of outcomesNot relevant. The Client, not Saipem, is responsible for the product. 
Respect for Privacy
PR8Total number of substantiated complaints regarding breaches of customer privacy and losses of customer dataNot relevant. Saipem’s Clients do not fall under the category of ‘consumers’, but tend to be large-size companies. Processing of sensitive data is not comparable to that required for physical persons. At any rate, no complaints of this type have been received. 
Compliance
PR9Monetary value of significant fines for non-compliance with laws and regulations concerning the provision and use of products and servicesNot relevant. The Client, not Saipem, is responsible for the product. At any rate, no cases of this type have been recorded.